Armbandjes met Miyuki Delica kraaltjes, prachtige subtiele armbandjes. Maar ook Boho Beadies, armbandjes met seadbead glaskraaltjes. Of ga je voor  stijlvolle Boho haaraccessoires. Boho Jewelry gebruikt natuurlijke materialen waaronder halfedelsteen en DQ (Designer quality). Wil je op de hoogte blijven van de nieuwste sieraden? Volg Boho Jewelry dan via Instagram, Facebook en Pinterest   
At the liberation of Paris in 1944, the American journalist Ernie Pyle observed that the women were all "brightly dressed in white or red blouses and colourful peasant skirts, with flowers in their hair and big flashy earrings."[64] while Lady Diana Cooper, whose husband, Duff Cooper, became British Ambassador to Paris that year, wrote that, during the occupation, Parisienne women had worn "grotesquely large hats hung with flowers and fruits and feathers and ribbons" as well as high carved wooden shoes.[65] However, in contrast to such striking bohemian adornments and subsequently the "New Look" (which itself scandalised some Parisennes), the clothes of the post-war bohemians were predominantly black: when Gréco first performed outside Saint-Germain she affronted some of her audience by wearing "black trousers, her bare feet slipped into golden sandals".[66] In old age she claimed that this style of dress arose from poverty:
By contrast, short bobbed hair was often a Bohemian trait,[33] having originated in Paris c.1909 and been adopted by students at the Slade[45] several years before American film actresses such as Colleen Moore and Louise Brooks ("the girl in the black helmet") became associated with it in the mid-1920s. This style was plainly discernible on a woodblock self-portrait of 1916 by Dora Carrington, who had entered the Slade in 1910,[46] and, indeed, the journalist and historian Sir Max Hastings has referred to "poling punts occupied by reclining girls with bobbed hair" as an enduring, if misleading, popular image of the "idyll before the storm" of the First World War.[47]

In the United States adherents of the "beat" counter-culture (probably best defined by Jack Kerouac's novel, On the Road, set in the late 1940s, written in 1952 and published in 1957) were associated with black polo-neck (or turtle neck) sweaters, blue denim jeans and sandals. The influence of this movement could be seen in the persona and songs of Bob Dylan in the early to mid-1960s, "road" films like Easy Rider (1969) and the punk-oriented "New Wave" of the mid-1970s, which, among other things, produced a boho style icon in Deborah Harry of the New York band Blondie, whom photographer David LaChapelle has described as "the definition of cool".[82] (However, as with some American musicians of the mid-1960s, such as Sonny and Cher, Blondie came to international prominence only after a tour of Britain in 1978.[83])
Vintage style Native American inspired jewelry and Bohemian chic at its best! This thin pewter tone totem pole and feather cuff bracelet is hand crafted in California. This designer vintage inspired bracelet is a favorite amongst the boho chic, artistic, spiritual like-minded fashionistas. Let your free spirit fly with this bohemian bangle. A style that adds vintage elegance to any leisure day outfit can also be worn for your formal special events. It’s a perfect way to express your creativit...
In the mid-to-late 1980s, variants of the short and fundamentally un-Bohemian rah-rah skirt (which originated with cheerleaders) were combined with leather or demin to create a look with some Bohemian or even gothic features (for example, by the singing duo Strawberry Switchblade who took inspiration from 1970s punk fashion[129]). In the 1990s the term, "hippie chic", was applied to Tom Ford’s collections for the Italian house of Gucci. These drew on, among other influences, the style, popular in retrospect, of Talitha Getty (died 1971), actress wife of John Paul Getty and step-granddaughter of Dorelia McNeil, who was represented most famously in a photograph of her and her husband taken by Patrick Lichfield in Marrakesh, Morocco in 1969.[130] Recalling the influx of hippies into Marrakesh in 1968, Richard Neville, then editor of Oz, wrote that "the dapper drifters in embroidered skirts and cowboy boots were so delighted by the bright satin '50s underwear favoured by the matrons of Marrakesh that they wore them outside their denims à la Madonna [the singer] twenty-five years later".[131]
By this time, such movements as the Rational Dress Society (1881), with which the Morrises and Georgiana Burne-Jones were involved, were beginning to exercise some influence on women's dress, although the pre-Raphaelite look was still considered "advanced" in the late years of the 19th century.[22] Queen Victoria's precocious daughter Princess Louise, an accomplished painter and artist who mixed in bohemian circles, was sympathetic to rational dress and to the developing women's movement generally (although her rumoured pregnancy at the age of 18 was said to have been disguised by tight corsetry).[23] However, it was not really until the First World War that "many working women ... embarked on a revolution in fashion that greatly reduced the weight and restrictions imposed on them by their clothing".[24] Some women working in factories wore trousers and the brassiere (invented in 1889 by the feminist Herminie Cadolle[25] and patented in America by Mary Phelps Jacob in 1914) began gradually to supersede the corset.[26] In shipyards "trouser suits" (the term, "pantsuit" was adopted in America in the 1920s) were virtually essential to enable women to shin up and down ladders.[27] Music hall artists also helped to push the boundaries of fashion; these included Vesta Tilley, whose daring adoption on stage of well tailored male dress not only had an influence on men's attire, but also foreshadowed to an extent styles adopted by some women in the inter-war period. It was widely understood that Tilley sought additional authenticity by wearing male underclothing, although off stage she was much more conventional in both her dress and general outlook.[28]

In modern use, the term "Bohemian" is applied to people who live unconventional, usually artistic, lives. The adherents of the "Bloomsbury Group", which formed around the Stephen sisters, Vanessa Bell and Virginia Woolf in the early 20th century, are among the best-known examples. The original "Bohemians" were travellers or refugees from central Europe (hence, the French bohémien, for "gypsy").
What is this Bohemian frenzy, you ask? The craze first started around the 1950s/19060s by hippie travelers wearing visibly eclectic clothing, taking influence from every land they set their foot in. Bohemian dressing expressed the hippie free-spirited lifestyle back in the day, and then returned after a couple of decades. It has officially taken over runways, red carpets, and even bridal collections (remember Kate Moss’s rehearsal dinner dress?). Dreamcatchers, everything with pom-poms, printed dresses, mystic jewelry with a whimsical mix of rich cultures like Indian, Egyptian, Moroccan, Turkish and parts of South America – boho is everywhere. And, words like “boho-chic’ and ‘boho’ are all from the Bohemian order too.

When it comes to bohemian style, not everyone is a free spirit and a brave soul to go running on the streets on this meeting of style and patterns. But this might be it! The season you rock the boho-chic look for the first time. Bohemians were known as traveling people across the Europe, so if you feel like making your life more adventurous try to take your adrenaline up a notch. There are some unwritten rules when it comes to this "non-bourgeois" fashion style, but take a look at our collection on boho maxi dress and look charming on your bohemian lace dress.
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