After the Second World War Christian Dior's "New Look", launched in Paris in 1947, though drawing on styles that had begun to emerge in 1938-9,[57] set the pattern for women's fashion generally until the 1960s. Harking back in some ways to the Belle Epoque of the late 19th and early 20th centuries – and thus not a "new" look as such (by early 1948, it was simply known as "The Look" in America[58]) – it was criticised by some as excessively feminine and, with its accompanying corsets and rustle of frilled petticoats, as setting back the "work of emancipation won through participation in two world wars".[59] It also, for a while, bucked the trend towards boyish fashion that, as after the First World War, tended to follow major conflicts.[60]
By the early 1920s, what had been a wartime expedient – the need to economise on material – had become a statement of freedom by young women, manifested by shorter hemlines (just above the knee by 1925–6[29]) and boyish hairstyles, accompanied by what Robert Graves and Alan Hodge described as "the new fantastic development of Jazz music".[30] At the Antwerp Olympic Games in 1920 the French tennis player Suzanne Lenglen attracted attention with a knee length skirt that revealed her suspender belt whenever she leapt to smash a ball. From then on, sportwear for women, as with day-to-day clothes, became freer,[31] although, after the Second World War, when the American player Gussie Moran appeared at the Wimbledon championships of 1949 in a short skirt that revealed lace-trimmed panties, the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club accused her of bringing "vulgarity and sin into tennis" and shunned the outfit's designer Teddy Tinling for many years.[32]

The bohemian traits of post-war Paris spread to other urban parts of the French-speaking world, notably to Algiers, where an underground culture of "jazz clubs, girls and drugs" grew up - in the words of punk rock producer Marc Zermati, who was in the city at the height of the Algerian war in the late 1950s, "all very French".[76] However, that war marked a turning point which, in the view of some, was so traumatic that "ordinary French people" looked instead to America as "a new model for pleasure and happiness".[77] This, in turn, led to the ye-ye music of the early to mid 1960s (named after the British band, the Beatles' use of "yeah, yeah" in some their early songs[78]) and the rise of such singers as Johnny Halliday and Françoise Hardy. The French also adopted a number of British singers (Petula Clark, Gillian Hills, Jane Birkin) who performed successfully in French, Birkin forming a long-term relationship with singer/songwriter Serge Gainsbourg, who was a seminal figure in French popular music in the 1960s and 70s. In 1968 major industrial and student unrest in Paris and other parts of France came close to ousting the government of President Charles de Gaulle, who, after leading the Free French during the Second World War, had returned to power at the time of the Algerian emergency. The events of 1968 represented a further significant landmark in post-war France,[79] although their longer term impact was probably more on cultural, social and academic life than on the political system, which, through the constitution of the Fifth Republic (1958), has remained broadly intact.[80] Indeed, one paradox of 1968 was that the first student demonstrations broke out at Nanterre, whose catchment area included the affluent and "chic" 16th and 17th arrondissements of Paris. Its students were more modish and "trendy" than those of the Sorbonne in the city's Latin Quarter, being described at the time in terms that typify more generally the styles and attitudes of young people the late 1960s:


I LOVE this dress. I had been having some bad days lately where I've been hating the way all of my clothes look on my body (I'm a bigger girl, roughly 180lbs and 5 feet tall) so I ordered this dress as a hope it'll cheer me up and boy did it. It's so flattering on me, and fits perfectly. I was so excited by how much I loved this dress that I immediately ordered another one in another color. I wish there were more color options (I would die for a black one with flowers on it) so I could wear it everyday. I don't remember the last time I bought something that I loved this much and that made me feel this confident. My only issue is I'll need to hem it a little since it just barely drags on the ground, but that's standard for being short ... full review
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