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^ Quoted in Halliwell's Filmgoer's Companion (10th ed. 1993) edited by John Walker. Almost 70 years after Lombard's death, the Sunday Times described red lipstick as the "ne plus ultra [not further beyond] of make up ... We respect red lipstick as a badge of loveliness and youth (Georgia May), bold style (Florence Welch), sexual confidence (Scarlett Johansson) and old-school glamour (Rosie Huntington-Whiteley) – and, above all, we appreciate that it doesn't work for everyone": Shane Watson in Style, 4 December 2011.
I'm 5'4" 125 lbs and ordered the 0/2 (FYI: the dress is labeled S/Small when you receive it). These maxi style dresses usually don't look very good on me (they are too long for my height) but this one looks amazing and doesn't make me look short and stumpy. It's classy and sexy at the same time. Speaking of sexy, if you have larger boobs (I'm a 34D) be prepared to show a little side boob in this dress.
I purchase. LOT of tops. Bc,u can mix w anything.. slacks, shorts, skirts - short, midi long etc to create a totally different look. Have paid LOTS for crummy & little for great. This shirt falls in the second category. LOVE it- fit, style, material.. it’s all good. I don’t have much time to write reviews .. but bc I have SO many ugly shirts in my closet for which I paid a small fortune, had to throw in a mention for this flattering top. The simplest feature to make ANY top mute flattering?? Why they aren’t on to this yet I have no idea.. is a v neck. ESP if u r on the larger side for bust .. so.. so.. simple.

Vintage style Native American inspired jewelry and Bohemian chic at its best! Multiple seamless bangles of brass tone mixed with crystals and braided wax linen in salmon, forest green, and butterscotch brown colors This designer vintage inspired bracelet is a favorite amongst the boho chic, artistic, spiritual like-minded fashionistas. Let your free spirit fly with this bohemian bangles set. It’s a perfect way to express your creativity and it’s a great addition to accessorize your wardrobe. ...
Whether you just consider yourself a free spirit or you're an all-out bohemian fashionista, our boho collection brings vintage-style staples to your wardrobe for at incredible prices. Dress to impress on your night out in an embroidered shirt paired with a handcrafted statement necklace for a boho look that is both effortless and glamorous. You can grab a slouchy bucket bag to complement your breezy peasant top. Your hair will shine when adorned with gold leaves or an ivory and rhinestone headband. Add a dramatic floral kimono or thrift store jacket, or finish your look with a colorful pashmina-style wrap. You can even bring your sweet, flowy dresses into the colder months with inspiration from our warm and wintery lookbook.
One social historian has observed that "the innocuous woollen jersey, now known [in Britain] as the jumper or the pullover, was the first item of clothing to become interchangeable between men and women and, as such, was seen as a dangerous symptom of gender confusion".[29] Trousers for women, sometimes worn mannishly as an expression of sexuality (as by Marlene Dietrich as a cabaret singer in the 1930 film, Morocco, in which she dressed in a white tie suit and kissed a girl in the audience[54]) also became popular in the 1920s and 1930s, as did aspects of what many years later would sometimes be referred to as "shabby chic".[55] Winston Churchill's niece Clarissa was among those who wore a tailored suit in the late 1930s.[56]
^ In 2013 The Oldie published a cartoon depicting women suffragettes of the early 20th century with the caption "... but I'm not sure about this proposal to burn our whalebone corsets" (Oldie, February 2013). A pragmatic 21st-century view was that "feminism is not about burning your bra in the street. It is about [among other things] women getting up in the morning and leaving the house to go to a job that pays them an actual wage ..." (Laura Smith, letter in Metro, 30 October 2012).
It’s hard to say whether she’s a grand synthesis of all the pre-Raphaelite pictures ever made … whether she’s an original or a copy. In either case she’s a wonder. Imagine a tall lean woman in a long dress of some dead purple stuff, guiltless of hoops (or of anything else I should say) with a mass of crisp black hair heaped into great wavy projections on each of her temples … a long neck, without any collar, and in lieu thereof some dozen strings of outlandish beads.[10]
By contrast, short bobbed hair was often a Bohemian trait,[33] having originated in Paris c.1909 and been adopted by students at the Slade[45] several years before American film actresses such as Colleen Moore and Louise Brooks ("the girl in the black helmet") became associated with it in the mid-1920s. This style was plainly discernible on a woodblock self-portrait of 1916 by Dora Carrington, who had entered the Slade in 1910,[46] and, indeed, the journalist and historian Sir Max Hastings has referred to "poling punts occupied by reclining girls with bobbed hair" as an enduring, if misleading, popular image of the "idyll before the storm" of the First World War.[47]
Look no further than Free People for the best styles for bags. Our brand has a wide selection of handbags & wallets that suits the lifestyles of every sort of girl. You can also find bags from designer brands like Campomaggi or Liebeskind. Choose from crossbodies to hobo styles to find the perfect bag for you. If you are a bohemian girl at heart, look towards our collection of leather and woven fringe bags. The more classic and modern girls will love our collection of refined and structured satchel bags. From super simple satchels with buckle detailing to satchels with bright colors and intricate stitch detailing, Free People has got it right. The sporty girl will lust over our rugged leather and denim backpacks. They are perfect to throw on for a day at the beach or a long bike ride. The edgy and sophisticated girl is meant for our clutches and more feminine handbags & wallets. Whether you are always on the go, love going out, or just want something practical and chic for everyday wear, Free People's collection won't let you down.
By this time, such movements as the Rational Dress Society (1881), with which the Morrises and Georgiana Burne-Jones were involved, were beginning to exercise some influence on women's dress, although the pre-Raphaelite look was still considered "advanced" in the late years of the 19th century.[22] Queen Victoria's precocious daughter Princess Louise, an accomplished painter and artist who mixed in bohemian circles, was sympathetic to rational dress and to the developing women's movement generally (although her rumoured pregnancy at the age of 18 was said to have been disguised by tight corsetry).[23] However, it was not really until the First World War that "many working women ... embarked on a revolution in fashion that greatly reduced the weight and restrictions imposed on them by their clothing".[24] Some women working in factories wore trousers and the brassiere (invented in 1889 by the feminist Herminie Cadolle[25] and patented in America by Mary Phelps Jacob in 1914) began gradually to supersede the corset.[26] In shipyards "trouser suits" (the term, "pantsuit" was adopted in America in the 1920s) were virtually essential to enable women to shin up and down ladders.[27] Music hall artists also helped to push the boundaries of fashion; these included Vesta Tilley, whose daring adoption on stage of well tailored male dress not only had an influence on men's attire, but also foreshadowed to an extent styles adopted by some women in the inter-war period. It was widely understood that Tilley sought additional authenticity by wearing male underclothing, although off stage she was much more conventional in both her dress and general outlook.[28]
Free People, a specialty women’s clothing brand, is the destination for bohemian fashion that features the latest trends and vintage collections for women who live free through fashion, art, music, and travel. The brand offers a wide range of products from apparel (think: jeans, leather jackets, sweaters, crop tops, maxi skirts and more), to accessories, intimates, outerwear, shoes, intimates, swimwear, activewear, and beauty – all reflecting a high level of quality, invoking attributes of femininity, spirit, and creativity in its design, while creating the perfect festival clothing. Known for its playful femininity, the brand is a destination for party dresses, black dresses, wrap dresses, minis and maxis.
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