Get in touch with nature. Retreat back into a natural glow with this matte Tree of Life bracelet. The realistic, simple texture of the bangle reflects the true wealth of nature, vintage beauty, and a bohemian lifestyle. This style will inspire the creative, boho chic, whimsical like-minded fashionistas. Available in Pewter and 14K Gold Dipped. Made in USA. Length: 7 Width: 0.25 Measurements: 7"L x 0.25"W Diameter: 2.5

We're passionate about exploring the earth, uncovering the most beautiful fabrics and embellishments to use in our designs. From Marrakech to Jaipur, these textiles are storytellers ~ they speak of their history and traditions of craft, of adventures abroad, secret marketplaces, culture and creativity. It is the stories that make our products unique and you'll find their inspiration woven into the fibres of each of our designs. We make every bag by hand in Victoria, Canada.
The Penguin Social History of Britain noted that "by the 1920s newspapers were filled with advertisements for 'lingerie' and 'undies' which would have been classed as indecent a generation earlier".[33] Thus, in Ben Travers' comic novel Rookery Nook (1923), a young woman evicted from home in her nightwear and requiring day clothes remarked, "Combies. That's all right. But in the summer you know, we don't ...",[34] while in Agatha Christie's thriller, The Seven Dials Mystery (1929), the aristocratic heroine, Lady "Bundle" Brent, wore only "a negligible trifle" under her dress; like many real life "it girls" of her class, she had been freed from the "genteel expectations" of earlier generations.[35] In Hollywood the actress Carole Lombard, who, in the 1930s, combined feistiness with sexual allure, never wore a brassière and "avoided panties".[36] However, she famously declared that though "I live by a man's code designed to fit a man's world ... at the same time I never forget that a woman's first job is to choose the right shade of lipstick"[37] Coincidentally, sales of men's undershirts fell dramatically in the United States when Lombard's future husband, Clark Gable, was revealed not to be wearing one in a famous motel bedroom scene with Claudette Colbert in the film It Happened One Night (1934). According to Gable, "the idea was looking half-naked and scaring the brat into her own bed on the other side of the blanket [hanging from a clothesline to separate twin beds]". However, he "gave the impression that going without was a vital sign of a man's virility"[38] More generally, the adoption by the American movie industry of the Hays Production Code in the early 1930s had a significant effect on how moral, and especially sexual, issues were depicted on film. This included a more conservative approach to matters of dress. Whereas the sort of scanty lingerie on show in some earlier productions (for example, Joan Blondell and Barbara Stanwyck in Night Nurse, 1931)[39] had tended to reflect trends that, in the 1920s, defied convention and were regarded many young women as liberating, by the early years of the Depression such displays came to be regarded quite widely as undesirable. Developments in the late 1960s and 70s, when the strictures of the code were abandoned, followed a similar pattern, although, by then, it was often women themselves who were in the vanguard of resistance to sexualised imagery.
By the early 1920s, what had been a wartime expedient – the need to economise on material – had become a statement of freedom by young women, manifested by shorter hemlines (just above the knee by 1925–6[29]) and boyish hairstyles, accompanied by what Robert Graves and Alan Hodge described as "the new fantastic development of Jazz music".[30] At the Antwerp Olympic Games in 1920 the French tennis player Suzanne Lenglen attracted attention with a knee length skirt that revealed her suspender belt whenever she leapt to smash a ball. From then on, sportwear for women, as with day-to-day clothes, became freer,[31] although, after the Second World War, when the American player Gussie Moran appeared at the Wimbledon championships of 1949 in a short skirt that revealed lace-trimmed panties, the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club accused her of bringing "vulgarity and sin into tennis" and shunned the outfit's designer Teddy Tinling for many years.[32]

Post-war Paris was recalled fondly in 2007 when France introduced a ban on smoking in public places. The aroma of Gauloises and Gitanes was, for many years, thought to be an inseparable feature of Parisian café society, but the owner of Les Deux Magots, once frequented by Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus and other writers, observed that "things have changed. The writers of today are not so addicted to cigarettes".[73] A British journalist who interviewed Juliette Gréco in 2010 described Les Deux Magots and the Café de Flore as "now overpriced tourist hotspots" and noted that "chain stores and expensive restaurants have replaced the bookshops, cafés and revolutionary ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir's Rive Gauche".[74] As measures of changing attitudes to cuisine and fashion, by the early 21st century 80% of French croissants were being made in food plants, while, by 2014, only one factory continued to manufacture the traditional male beret associated with printers, artists, political activists and, during the inter-war years, the tennis player Jean Borotra.[75]
After the Second World War Christian Dior's "New Look", launched in Paris in 1947, though drawing on styles that had begun to emerge in 1938-9,[57] set the pattern for women's fashion generally until the 1960s. Harking back in some ways to the Belle Epoque of the late 19th and early 20th centuries – and thus not a "new" look as such (by early 1948, it was simply known as "The Look" in America[58]) – it was criticised by some as excessively feminine and, with its accompanying corsets and rustle of frilled petticoats, as setting back the "work of emancipation won through participation in two world wars".[59] It also, for a while, bucked the trend towards boyish fashion that, as after the First World War, tended to follow major conflicts.[60]
Everett recalled also the Johns' woods "with wild cherry trees in blossom, and ... a model with flying red hair, clad in white, being chased in and out of the trees by nude children".[43] With similar lack of inhibition, as early as 1907 the American heiress Natalie Barney (1875–1972) was leading like-minded women in sapphic dances in her Parisian garden,[44] photographs of which look little different from scenes at Woodstock in 1969 and other "pop" festivals of the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Armbandjes met Miyuki Delica kraaltjes, prachtige subtiele armbandjes. Maar ook Boho Beadies, armbandjes met seadbead glaskraaltjes. Of ga je voor  stijlvolle Boho haaraccessoires. Boho Jewelry gebruikt natuurlijke materialen waaronder halfedelsteen en DQ (Designer quality). Wil je op de hoogte blijven van de nieuwste sieraden? Volg Boho Jewelry dan via Instagram, Facebook en Pinterest   
Vintage style Bohemian chic jewelry at its best! Make a statement with this beautiful pair of tribal inspired T.R.U. Large Chevron Chandelier earrings. Hanging from a chevron design are multifaceted red carnelian beads to give you that pop of accent. This vintage inspired chandelier earrings set is a favorite amongst the boho chic, artistic, spiritual like-minded fashionistas. Let your free spirit fly with these bohemian earrings. A style that adds vintage elegance to any leisure day outfit c...
Boho is short for the word bohemian. It first came about when France was flooded with an influx of Romani gypsies. The French loved the elaborate style with an old world feel and so started to emulate it, calling it "Bohemian" after the region of Bohemia, from which they were immigrating. From there, the word began to be used to describe more of an attitude of freedom to be yourself, going against the grain of popular culture, and appreciating peace, eventually evolving into a fashion style or trend that we are so on board with!
Effie Gray, whose marriage to John Ruskin was annulled in 1854 prior to her marrying the pre-Raphaelite painter John Millais, is known to have used flowers as an adornment and probably also as an assertive "statement". While in Scotland with Ruskin (still her husband) and Millais, she gathered foxgloves to place in her hair. She wore them at breakfast despite being asked by her husband not to do so, a gesture of defiance, at a time of growing crisis in their relationship, that came to the critical notice of Florence Nightingale[15] (who tended to regard others of her sex with "scarcely concealed scorn" and was generally unsympathetic to "women's rights"[16]). A few weeks earlier, on Midsummer Day, Effie (possibly inspired by Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream) was said by her hostess, Pauline Trevelyan, to have "looked lovely" with stephanotis in her hair at an evening party in Northumberland,[17] while, the previous year, a male friend had brought glass flowers for her hair from Venice.[18] Ruskin's father was evidently shocked to learn that, when Effie herself was in Venice, she had removed her bonnet in public, ostensibly because of the heat.[18]
By the mid-1980s, the American singer Madonna had turned the bra into a positive, even provocative, fashion statement. Madonna's flamboyant and gritty style (notably seen to bohemian effect alongside Rosanna Arquette in the 1985 film, Desperately Seeking Susan) was, in turn, a precursor of so-called "girl power" that was associated in the 1990s with various prominent young women (such as singers Courtney Love, who played the 1999 Glastonbury Festival in a headline-grabbing pink bra,[127] and the more commercially oriented Spice Girls) and offbeat or quirky American television series (Xena: Warrior Princess, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Caroline in the City, Sex and the City).

Vintage style Native American inspired jewelry and Bohemian chic at its best! Multiple seamless bangles of brass tone mixed with crystals and braided wax linen in salmon, forest green, and butterscotch brown colors This designer vintage inspired bracelet is a favorite amongst the boho chic, artistic, spiritual like-minded fashionistas. Let your free spirit fly with this bohemian bangles set. It’s a perfect way to express your creativity and it’s a great addition to accessorize your wardrobe. ...
The birdsnest girls like to think of themselves as your wardrobe wingbirds! Our mission is to solve women’s wardrobe dilemmas by providing personalised styling advice, express delivery, styled outfit inspiration, above-and-beyond customer service, no hassle returns and a vast range of brands and sizes for all body shapes, both online and in-store. We want you to find and LOVE your own style. Our little Nest is based in the Snowy Mountains town of Cooma, NSW where our family owned business now employs around 140 local birds!
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